Celebrate Kwanzaa in Style

During the holiday season, we think about family, faith and festive gatherings; we also think about Kwanzaa, the holiday tradition that honors African-American ancestry and brings a sense of identity and belonging. The three colors of Kwanzaa: red, black, and green are rich in meaning. Honor your heritage by wearing one of these meaningful colors for Kwanzaa this season.

“I celebrate Kwanzaa with my 2 year old grandson. I enjoy teaching him all about his culture heritage as an African American and the seven principles that Kwanzaa represent.” 

“Kwanzaa in our home is celebrated with tradition, kindness, and the memory of ancestry in our hearts.” 

“The grandchildren each rehearse the seven principles throughout the week. On the last day we have the feast and light the candles. Every one who attends have to wear something afrocentric. I ordered a lot of caftans from Ashro for our celebration this year. We are having a vegetarian Kwanzaa our main dish is going to be brown stew tofu and black eye peas rice and peas.” 

“We celebrate by decorating main room with Kwanzaa colors, posters & flag. We give Kwanzaa greetings to everyone. We light Kinara candles black, red & green. We celebrate Kwanzaa with drumming, reading African pledge with principals of blackness. We have a big Kwanzaa festival and have a gifts exchange with parents & children.” 

“Kwanzaa is celebrated with seven family gathering where families light kinaaras, or seven candle candelabras, with African culture and discussing the Nguzo Saba, or seven principles. Kwanzaa also includes a feast and gift and runs from December 26 through January 1. Kwanzaa originated in 1966 as a way for African-American to celebrate their heritage and traditional African culture. Kwanzaa had seven principles. These principles includes unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility. Other principles include economics, purpose, creativity and faith. Each evening, families gather for drumming, story reading and traditional African foods, and a child lights one of the seven candles on the kinaara that correspond to the colors of the African flag. Each celebration day has its own tangible object to correspond with one of the principles. Kwanzaa’s largest celebration occurs on December 31 when families meet for a huge feast known as a karamu that includes each family member drinking from a unity cup. After each child and adult has had a sip, the family’ s elder pour out the end of the cup in each of the cardinal directions in remembrance of the family’s ancestors.” 

“I celebrate Kwanzaa with family & friends with plenty of food, drinks, games, and happy music. I love when we all get together and enjoy the real for all of us being here today! I get excited when when everyone come together as family should be. Family means a lot to me because it’s the love of Christ JESUS Amen!!!” 

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